Tuesday, 21 January 2014

The Islamic insurgency in the Philippines

The Islamic insurgency in the Philippines relates to political anxieties and open conflicts which started in 1969 between the Jihadist rebel groups and the Government of the Philippines. The Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) was set up by University of the Philippines professor Nur Misuari to criticize the killings of over 60 Filipino Muslims and afterward became an provoker against the government while the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), a splinter group from the MNLF, was set up to look for an Islamic state within the Philippines and is more essential and more violent. Conflict dates back to 1899 during the rebellion of the Bangsamoro people to oppose foreign rule from the United States. Hostilities ignited again starting in the 1960s when the government started to oppose imminent revolts by killing above 60 Filipino Muslims and continues up to now.

Friday, 1 March 2013

The Islamic insurgency

The Islamic insurgency in the Philippines refers to political tensions and open hostilities which began in 1969[8] between the Jihadist rebel groups and the Government of the Philippines. The Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) was established by University of the Philippines professor Nur Misuari to condemn the killings of more than 60 Filipino Muslims and later became an aggressor against the government while the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), a splinter group from the MNLF, was established to seek an Islamic state within the Philippines and is more radical and more aggressive. Conflict dates back to 1899 during the uprising of the Bangsamoro people to resist foreign rule from the United States. Hostilities ignited again starting in the 1960s when the government started to resist upcoming rebellions by killing more than 60 Filipino Muslims and continues up to present.

Tuesday, 17 July 2012

Insurgency

An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority (for example, an authority recognized as such by the United Nations) when those taking part in the rebellion are not recognized as belligerents. An insurgency can be fought via counter-insurgency warfare, and may also be opposed by measures to protect the population, and by political and economic actions of various kinds aimed at undermining the insurgents' claims against the incumbent regime. An "insurgency" may include, but not necessarily use, guerrilla warfare.

Not all rebellions are insurgencies. There have been many cases of non-violent rebellions, using civil resistance, as in the People Power Revolution in the Philippines in the 1980s that ousted President Marcos and the Egyptian Revolution of 2011. Where a revolt takes the form of armed rebellion, it may not be viewed as an insurgency if a state of belligerency exists between one or more sovereign states and rebel forces. For example, during the American Civil War, the Confederate States of America was not recognized as a sovereign state, but it was recognized as a belligerent power, and thus Confederate warships were given the same rights as United States warships in foreign ports.

When insurgency is used to describe a movement's unlawfulness by virtue of not being authorized by or in accordance with the law of the land, its use is neutral. However when it is used by a state or another authority under threat, "insurgency" often also carries an implication that the rebels' cause is illegitimate, whereas those rising up will see the authority itself as being illegitimate.

A variety of terms, none precisely defined, all fall under the category of insurgency: rebellion, uprisings, etc. The value of the formal models (discussed below) is to have a taxonomy to categorize insurgencies. No two insurgencies are identical. The basis of the insurgency can be political, economic, religious, or ethnic, or a combination of factors.

Sometimes there may be one or more simultaneous insurgencies (multipolar) occurring in a country. The Iraq insurgency is one example of a recognized government versus multiple groups of insurgents. Other historic insurgencies, such as the Russian Civil War, have been multipolar rather than a straightforward model made up of two sides. During the Angolan Civil War there were two main sides: MPLA and UNITA. At the same time, there was a another separatist movement for the independence of the Cabinda region headed up by FLEC.

Multipolarity extends the definition of insurgency to situations where there is no recognized authority, as in the Somali Civil War, especially the period from 1998 to 2006, where it broke into quasi-autonomous smaller states, fighting among one another in changing alliances.

Monday, 5 September 2011

COUNTERING GLOBAL INSURGENCY

This paper proposes a new strategic approach to the global War on Terrorism.
The paper argues that the War is best understood as a global insurgency, initiated by a
diffuse grouping of Islamist movements that seek to re-make Islam’s role in the world order.
They use terrorism as their primary, but not their sole tactic. Therefore counterinsurgency
rather than traditional counterterrorism may offer the best approach to defeating global jihad.
But classical counterinsurgency, as developed in the 1960s, is designed to defeat insurgency
in a single country. It demands measures – coordinated political-military response,
integrated regional and inter-agency measures, protracted commitment to a course of action
– that cannot be achieved at the global level in today’s international system. Therefore a
traditional counterinsurgency paradigm will not work for the present War: instead, a
fundamental reappraisal of counterinsurgency is needed, to develop methods effective
against a globalised insurgency.
Counterinsurgency in its traditional guise is based on systems analysis. But Cartesian
systems analysis cannot handle the complexity inherent in counterinsurgency. Fortunately,
since the 1960s scientists have developed new approaches to systems analysis, based on the
emerging theory of Complexity, which does provide means for handling this complexity.
Therefore complex systems analysis of insurgent systems may be the tool needed to develop
a fundamentally new version of counterinsurgency for this War.